hospital ER

Work, Injuries, Care and Recovery
Work, Injuries, Care and Recovery 1024 768 Neal

“I’ve learned from…injury and come back even more humble.”—Troy Polamalu, former NFL player

Injury in the workplace is something to be avoided yet prepared for.  And while most workplaces aren’t NFL fields of play, workplace injuries happen everywhere from offices to construction sites to kitchens.

As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, Frontline ER is here to provide both.  Included here are some tips as well as some explanation of how we can help when an injury does occur.

Regardless of your industry or business segment, there are some universal ways to avoid injury:

  • Educate your employees on proper use of equipment and make them aware of safe workplace practices.
    • Have a safety and wellness plan tailored to your company. Set a standard.
    • Conduct formal training sessions.
  • Engineer your workplace for safe working conditions.
    • Have clean and organized work areas and supply and toll areas.
    • Understand and monitor where most accidents can (and do) happen in your workplace.
    • Provide protection equipment.
    • Have adequate staffing levels.
    • Inspect and maintain company vehicles.
  • Enforce the rules.
    • Monitor safety measures.
    • Keep track of workplace injuries and incidents.

When accidents and incidents do occur, waste no time in tending to and caring for your employee.  Frontline ER is especially skilled in the treatment of a myriad of injuries and is well prepared for the documentation of those injuries for insurance and workman’s compensation requirements.

Frontline ER’s special services include:

  • No appointment necessary.
  • The same capabilities as a hospital emergency room without the wait.
  • Experienced medical staff and emergency physicians certified per DOT regulations.
  • Able to provide written reports about the injured employee once the visit is complete.
  • Allowance for stays up to 23 hours or overnight.
  • Transfer to area hospitals with immediate admission. Transportation partners include ambulance and helicopter services.

It is our top priority to ensure the safe and immediate treatment of your injured employee, with the goal of getting your business back on track faster.

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

*Photos courtesy of Unsplash

 

Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for COVID-19
Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for COVID-19 1024 745 Neal

As the battle against COVID-19 continues, science continues to find and use new and more effective treatments against the virus.

If you are high-risk and meet certain criteria, Frontline ER has a treatment option for you.  It’s called Monoclonal Antibody Treatment, mAb for short, and it’s available now.

“If you test positive for COVID-19 and meet certain criteria, you can be treated with mAb,” Dr. Neal Agarwal said.  “It is the same treatment that was given to former President Trump when he was hospitalized for the disease.”

Dr. Agarwal is Medical Director for Frontline ER.

To be administered this treatment, you must meet the following criteria and be prepared to stay overnight for observation:

  • A body mass index (BMI) greater than 35
  • Suffer from chronic kidney disease, diabetes or an immunosuppressive disease
  • Be receiving treatment for any of the above
  • Are 65 or older
  • Or are at least 55 and suffer from cardiovascular disease, hypertension or chronic pulmonary disease
  • Are 12 to 17 with a BMI in the 85th percentile for their age and gender and suffer from a specific list of diseases, most prominently congenital heart disease or asthma.
  • Not have received the COVID-19 vaccine within the past 90 days.

“There is mounting new promising data that this treatment will reduce the amount of hospitalizations needed from COVID-19,” Dr. Agarwal added.

For more information and to see if you qualify for this treatment, please give us a call or contact us through our website.

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

 

Surviving Easter’s Goodies
Surviving Easter’s Goodies 1024 683 Neal

Easter is always a time of great joy—and sweets!  It is a day of temptation when it comes to our diet. It can be a day of binging on chocolate bunnies and marshmallow chicks!

So, how does one deal with this tsunami of sugar? Moderation, that’s how. And avoiding all of the aspects of treats.

Like Halloween, Easter can be a sugar nightmare unless you take a measured approach to how much or how many your celebrants can munch on.  Try a few of these ideas to help minimize the effects of the sugar, even if you can’t cut it out completely;

  • Start with a balanced breakfast or lunch before the egg hunt or celebration. Protein (eggs, meats), natural sugars (fruits) and “good” carbs (whole grain breads) will help balance the refined sugars in candy.
  • Practice moderation. As with Halloween, limit how much from their haul of goodies they can have.
  • Flush it out. Make sure lots of fresh, clean water is available to keep your family hydrated during the festivities.
  • Offer smaller portions, like a loot bag instead of a free-choice basket.
  • Just don’t give out candy. Yeah, we know that’s hard, but you can substitute things like homemade treats, carrots and things like hard-cooked eggs (really!).
  • And consider those in your group who are dealing with diabetes.

If your Easter celebrants do come down with an upset stomach or a reaction to the sugars or dies and ingredients, give us a call.  We can advise you how to treat that malady.  And we are here should things get really serious.

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

The Sisterhood of the ER
The Sisterhood of the ER 515 461 Neal

It takes a lot of work to realize a career as a physician.  It takes a village, a team, a shared vision.  It’s about knowing what you want to do, then doing it.  It is rare.

Now imagine you are a twin. Each of you has a medical degree.  And working, not only in the same field, but for the same organization.

Wow. That’s pretty rare, too!

We here at Frontline ER are very fortunate to have in our ranks two very talented doctors.  Dr. Mekeshia (Keshia) Fitzgerald and Dr. Meshann (Shann) Fitzgerald are two of our top-notch docs at our Richmond location.

“Our friends tell us that we are always together,” Keshia said.  “But never at work.”

The Doctors Fitzgerald started life in rural Mississippi.  Because of visionary parents, they grew up in a variety of places ranging from Georgia to California.  Each earned their medical degree (as well as undergraduate and advanced degrees) from different schools.

“Our mother felt we needed to aspire to something beyond a job at the local store,” Keshia said. “We learned to see past the immediate.”

Keshia earned her medical degree at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, PA.  Shann earned her MD from Creighton University in Omaha, NE. Both are active in their community as volunteers.

Each got involved with medicine because of an intense interest in science and in wanting to help people. And their family is intensely important to them.

“We graduated from medical school on successive weekends in 2006,” Shann said.  “We celebrated with our parents and brother.  It was a most special time for us.”

At Frontline ER they have worked as attending physicians since 2017 at our Houston location. This location serves patients in Mission Bend, Richmond and Sugar Land.

“We are very proud of and grateful for the Doctors Fitzgerald,” Dr. Ethan Tran said.  Dr. Tran is Medical Director for all Frontline ER locations.

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

Common Household Poisons and Their Treatment
Common Household Poisons and Their Treatment 599 640 Neal

Whether you know it or not, there are things in your house right now that could cause you, or, worse, your children, harm.

There are a number of items in your home that could or do contain components that are poisonous to children, adults and pets.

The first defense is prevention: secure these items out of reach of children and in their original containers.  And poison-proof your home.

A short list of things you should keep an eye on or allow limited access to:

  • Cosmetics and personal care products.
  • Bug and insect sprays (pesticides).
  • Pain medicines.
  • Laundry cleaners including soap pods, detergents and bleach.

What should you do if your child or you are exposed to or ingest any of these items?

First, call 9-1-1. Or Frontline ER.

Be sure you have access to the package or container, so you can tell the operator the nature of the item causing the emergency.  Read the label.  If you have more time, call the 800 number on the label and follow the guidelines spelled out on the label for an emergency. Some of those recommendations could include:

  • Inducement of vomiting (take care with this as many caustic materials can cause even more harm; see the link above).
  • Feeding of milk or water.
  • Washing of skin and clothing.
  • Flushing out eyes with clean water.

Should the operator tell you to seek immediate medical attention, call or visit your closest Frontline ER.  We are here to help and can help the treatment and recovery start sooner than a hospital ER can.

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

Keeping Warm and Safe During Cold Weather
Keeping Warm and Safe During Cold Weather 1024 768 Neal

This past week of extreme weather throughout Texas was—forgive this word—unprecedented. Snow, extreme cold, loss of heat and light, broken pipes and shut off water.

What are we supposed to do in times like this to stay safe, warm, dry and healthy?  A few of the difficulties that you might suffer should you have experienced these drastic conditions:

How can you prevent or treat these various maladies?

Hypothermia is caused when an individual is exposed to cold and wet conditions.  It is when the body loses heat faster than it can produce it.  Treatment involves warming the core of the person after removing any wet clothing.

Frostbite is an injury to the body caused by freezing It causes a loss of feeling and color in affected areas like fingers, toes and the end of one’s nose. Dress properly and minimize exposure of the skin to extreme cold temperatures.

Trenchfoot is caused when one’s feet are exposed to wet and cold conditions for prolonged periods.  It is usually the result of the whole body being cold and shutting down the circulation to the feet to keep the rest of the body warm. Skin tissue dies with this loss of circulation and the buildup of toxins. Avoid having wet, cold feet by staying dry and warm.

Being exposed to CO2 (carbon dioxide) is probably the most dangerous.  The colorless, odorless, tasteless non-flammable gas is usually emitted by appliances and devices burning gasoline, wood, propane, charcoal or other fuels in a poorly or non-vented area. Avoid using these devices or make sure they are vented appropriately or used outdoors.

Whether immediate treatment is applied or follow up is needed, an immediate visit or follow up is recommended.  Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

 

Broken Bones and Other Childhood Injuries
Broken Bones and Other Childhood Injuries 1024 683 Neal

As a parent we don’t want significant accidents to occur—but they do.

Kids suffer abrasions, cuts, scalds and burns.  They dislocate fingers and break bones. And they swallow things. While we don’t recommend that you encase your young ones in bubble wrap or tape their mouths shut, we do suggest you

The most common sources of injuries in children are due to:

  • Falls.
  • Bites and stings (animals and insects).
  • Accidental impacts (struck by a ball, colliding with another child; sports injuries)
  • Car accidents (mostly involving teenagers).
  • Cuts and puncture wounds.
  • Foreign objects (splinters and swallowing things).
  • Burns and scalding (usually involving stoves and heaters).

Fortunately, most of these result in non-fatal injuries. And most can be treated at home.

And when they can’t be treated at home, what should you do? Come see us when your child suffers one of these accidents and then they suffer:

  • Difficulty breathing.
  • The injury to their neck, head, back or spine.
  • Excessive bleeding, headache, nausea or vomiting.
  • Loss of consciousness.
  • Numbness.
  • The injury was caused by a dirty or rusty object.
  • The injury shows sign of infection.
  • A bite from a venomous or wild animal.
  • Constipation or bloating (due to ingesting a foreign object).

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

Affairs of the Heart
Affairs of the Heart 1024 768 Neal

Take things to heart.  Heartfelt. Places in the heart.

But a pain in the heart or your chest—not so romantic.

What should you do when you experience chest pains?  Is it your heart or something else? When should you head to the hospital ER or the acute care center?

First of all, there are different kinds of chest pain:

  • Tightness
  • Dull
  • Stabbing
  • Burning
  • Aching
  • Sharp

And the causes are just as varied:

  • Heart problems
  • Lung issues
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Bone, muscle or nerve issues

As you can see, at the top of that list are heart issues.  From coronary artery disease to heart attack to myocarditis to pericarditis to cardiomyopathy to valve issue these problems are nothing to ignore.

So, when should you seek out help? If your doctor isn’t available and immediate self-care options don’t help, consider an immediate visit to an acute care center (or calling 9-1-1) when you experience:

  • A crushing pain under your breastbone.
  • A pain that spreads to your jaw, left arm or back.
  • A sudden chest pain with a shortness of breath.
  • Nausea, dizziness or a rapid heart rate or rapid breathing.
  • A change in your color to ashen.
  • Very low blood pressure or low heart rate.

Frontline ER is an acute care emergency room providing healthcare services to the communities we live and work within. Give us a call or contact us through our website should you have more questions about our services.

Acute Care Versus a Hospital ER
Acute Care Versus a Hospital ER 870 1024 Neal

While Frontline ER has emergency room as part of its name, it is clear that we serve our communities with acute care.

So just what is the difference between an emergency room and an acute care center? And when should you go to the hospital ER and when should you use an urgent care center?

The answer isn’t always simple.  Usually health emergencies happen without warning and cause us to make split-second decisions.  A broken arm, chest pains or a sick infant in the middle of the night. However, there is a difference between “emergency” and “urgent.”

Hospital ERs are available and open to provide complex and critical care any time of the day or night.  They can care for a heart attack, life-and limb-threatening injuries and traumatic injuries resulting from car accidents. The best time to head for the hospital ER is when you are suffering chest pains, been severely burned, suspect stroke symptoms or have suffered a concussion. Plus they have the ability to admit you to their hospital should you require more intense care.

In the same vein, an urgent care center, like Frontline ER, is where you go when your doctor’s office is not open.  Anything you might consider consulting with your own PCP when they aren’t available, is a candidate affliction to talk with the urgent care physician about. Small cuts that might require stitches, sprains and strains, abdominal pain or fever without a rash are all basic ailments that could bring you to an urgent care center.

So take a moment to consider your injury or pain and then choose your care option.  Keep in mind, too, that should your injuries be more serious, that Frontline will recommend that you be taken to the nearest hospital for more acute care.

For more information, please give us a call or consult our website.